Archives for May 2015

Three Terrific Machine Quilting Techniques – Free-motion – Free form

Welcome to my third and final installment of posts on the Three Terrific Machine Quilting Techniques.

If you joined me for the first two posts on machine quilting you

  • gained an understanding of straight line machine quilting using a regular sewing machine with a walking foot installed and the feed dogs up, plus the many situations you may want to set up the machine for that function
  • learned how to install a darning or free-motion foot and lower the feed- dogs for free-motion quilting using that technique to stitch marked lines creating formal quilting patterns.

With that foundation established it is time for you to learn about using your regular sewing machine for free-motion quilting to stitch patterns without marked lines. I refer to the pattern style as free form; using the free-motion quilting technique to stitch patterns guided free-hand, without the aid of a computer and without following a marked line.

In future posts you will learn about many varied background fill patterns and delve into the details of useful accessories and attachments for the machine, but for right now let’s focus on the technique. Remember our plan is to gain insight in one small, very important concept and then we build on that.

oak-leaf-quilting-design-center

Here you see the now familiar Oak Leaf and Acorn example (shown in the 2 previous posts), but in this photo the tiny stippling background fill pattern is highlighted. I am showing you this style of free-motion quilting last because in the logical sequence for machine quilting all background fill patterns are added last, after the anchoring and after the motifs have been stitched.

 Joanie’s TIP: Remember, to evenly distribute the quilting throughout the entire quilt surface in each step of the process.

Free-form or free-hand Free-motion Quilting

When you learn Free-motion Quilting using a sewing machine (with the feed dogs lowered and a darning foot installed), stitching can occur in any direction and in straight or curved lines. You will be able to produce patterns with the lines of stitching, again just like a pen on paper. Spend time doodling on paper to learn the path that you would stitch for your own background fill patterns. If you do not lift the pencil, you create a pattern that could be stitched with continuous stitching, a very important goal of machine quilters.

When you practice a fill pattern by drawing it on paper until you have imprinted it in your brain, you will be able stitch on the quilt without marking at all or with limited marking.  Stitching without following a marked line is refereed to as free-form free-motion quilting, guided from a pattern imprinted in the brain.  The resulting patterns tend to be random, often with repeated forms that are not necessarily meant to be identical.

background fill pattern

This Leaf, loop and Daisy is one of 30 patterns in my Free-form Background Fill Pattern Packets you can purchase for download or have mailed to your door.

Let’s clear up some confusing terms

This is my understanding of some confusing terms. Free-motion is the technique; the set-up of the machine. Free-form is a style of the pattern, random and not marker. Free-hand means the stitching is hand guided from a pattern in your head. With all of these terms so similar, it is understandable that many people are confused; and the reason so many people look at me like I am not telling the truth when I say I used free-motion quilting to stitch the perfect grids and identical motifs for my  quilts. They think that term free-motion means that I guided the machine free-hand, when in reality I followed a marked line that has been washed away.

So if you are ready to set up your machine for free-motion quilting to free hand ten amazing free form patterns, head on over to the SHOP! page to learn about my 120 minute How-to DVD, Background Bonanza !

What can we do with free form patterns?

  • The patterns can be used edge to edge.
  • Sections of a quilt bundle can be filled with texture.
  • The background around previously stitched motif can be flattened with texture.

A quilter can stitch an identical pattern in a large scale to cover large spaces or tiny to flatten the background around a previously stitched motif to make it pop. Tiny patterns must be smaller than the motif they surround for contrast. 

tiny leaves free form background fill

 This leaf pattern (above) can be used as for all three purposes mentioned above depending on the size the pattern is stitched.

 

Leaf and Curl Background filler

Above you see an almost identical filler, Leaf and Curl, that could be used for all three functions again depending on the size it is stitched. I disregarded the patchwork when quilting this free-hand pattern.

 

Heirloom quilting by machine

This photo (above) shows how tiny stippling was added to the background of my Ivy Wreath Quilt How-to DVD after the ivy was stitched to flatten the background and let the pretty motifs stand out.

 

Great Outdoors Workshop

Free-form quilting is ideal for landscape quilts (above). Look at the patterns you will learn in my Great Outdoors Landscape Workshop or pattern. This hands-on workshop is among may classes I teach on background fillers.

Just for review

Remember these Free-motion facts: With the free-motion foot installed and the feed dogs lowered,

  • The operator controls the stitch length as well as the direction of the stitching line by moving the bundle with her hands.
  • Stitching can occur in any direction and in straight or curved lines.
  • The quilt bundle does not have to be rotated when changing the direction of the stitching. 

Whats Up for next week?

Most frequently asked questions about machine quilting and how I have discovered the answers may not be the important solutions you need.

Dashed-line-99CC99Read more About Joanie, her Career Highlights, or print Joanie’s Short Bio.
Can’t wait for a blog post of all of this advice? Explore helpful info already on the website: Glossary of Frequently used Machine Quilting Terms, How to Prepare for a Class, Quick Start Guide to Marking and Resizing Quilting Designs, Printable Charts for Quilting Facts, The Tips Page, and announcements of  Upcoming Events.

Dashed-line-99CC99Never miss an issue of this free e-zine, Joanie’s Life Changing Machine Quilting Lessons. Just watch for reminders from Joanie on her Facebook page or to receive a reminder sent to your inbox, use the sign-up form at the top of the sidebar on this page. 

If you feel you friends, family or quilt guild would benefit from this insight please invite them to join.  I’d really appreciate it!

Dashed-line-99CC99The information, illustrations and photographs on this blog copyright Joanie Zeier Poole unless otherwise noted. No reproduction in any form is permitted without permission. All rights reserved. Please ask permission for using any content and give credit when sharing what you have learned. Heirloom Quilting Designs was founded by Joanie Zeier Poole in 2000, a new millennium with a new dream for the future!

Three Terrific Machine Quilting Techniques – Free-motion – Formal

In the last post I gave an overview of straight line machine quilting on a regular sewing machine with a Walking Foot installed and the feed dogs up. In these next two posts, I will attempt to clear up the confusion between free-motion quilting and using the free-motion quilting technique for free-hand or following a marked line quilting.

Today’s post will introduce you to the technique of free-motion quilting and cover the first option for using the technique to stitch formal patterns.

Formal is a phrase I coined for  a style of free-motion stitching when patterns are formed by following a marked line (more below).  First, let’s cover a few instructions for setting up the machine, and the attachments used for the technique; then you will learn about the two styles of stitching that can result when using free-motion quilting techniques.

feed dogs copy feed-dogs-

Free-motion Machine Quilting happens when the layers of a quilt are stitched together using a sewing machine with the feed dogs lowered and a free-motion foot or darning foot installed. These photos show a regular sewing machine that has been set up for free-motion stitching; an open-toe free-motion foot has been installed to replace the regular sewing presser foot and the feed dogs have been lowered. When the feed dogs are lowered, they do not move the quilt bundle; you will have to move the bundle as the machine is stitching.  Whatever the stitch length you have the machine set on doesn’t matter because it is not functioning when the feed dogs are lowered.

Stitch width and lengthGOOD HABITS:

This is one of the tiny details that impact the machine’s ability to make the perfectly formed stitches that we desire. Consider adjusting the following settings before you stitch. With some newer machines, the owner’s manual will instruct you to set the stitch length setting to zero. When I have asked several machine manufacturers if I should do that on all machines, I was told that on some machines it did not have any consequence with the feed dogs lowered. Check your dealer or owner’s manual to find out the specifics for your machine(s).

Always do set the stitch width setting on zero. You want the machine to sew an absolutely straight line of stitches.

Hands on Quilt copy

You will control the length of each stitch as well as the direction of the stitching line by moving the bundle with your hands. Stitching can occur in any direction and in straight or curved lines. You will move the quilt bundle as the machine stitches to produce lines of stitching that form designs on the fabric, just like a pen on paper.

Aqua Table runnerI used the formal style or follow-the-marked-line free-motion quilting to stitch this table runner. The pattern was marked on the fabric with a water-soluble marker that washed away after the quilt was stitched.

machine quiltingYou can no longer see the marked line that has been washed away but this detail photo shows how the line of thread would follow the outlines the motifs in the identical manner that I used when I drew the original artwork with pencil on paper.

When you drop the feed dogs…

You must learn to coordinate the speed your foot is telling the machine to stitch with the speed your hands are moving the bundle to create smooth movements to achieve a consistent stitch length.

Remember too, when the feed dogs are lowered, the quilt does not have to be rotated when you want to change direction. The entire quilt could be oriented North for the entire process and never rotated. This can be a big advantage to the process depending on the size of the quilt bundle.

Marking a quiltHere you see a water-soluble marker that I use to mark all of my quilts (unless the fabric prevents me from seeing the blue line). We will learn more on marking in a later post, but the basic idea is to center the stabilized fabric on top of a design printed on paper and trace the outlines.

oak-leaf-quilting-design-centerHere you see the example quilt used for the anchoring lesson in the previous post on straight line stitching. For this project, all stitching lines were traced on the fabric before the layers were pin basted. The first stitching was the anchoring on the straight lines, next the motifs were stitched with follow the marked line free-motion quilting.

The last stitching that occurred on this piece was the fill pattern that is referred to as stippling. I used free-hand  free-motion quilting, which is the topic for my next post. Thanks for joining me for this blog post. I sincerely appreciate your interest in learning some of the hints I have included to make you more comfortable with this technique. I know this is just an introduction, but if you give it a try and if find this helpful let me know.

Quick Hints:

I will end with a myth busting Quick Hint.  This very simple advice could be just what you need to hear if your free-motion quilting is not as accurate as you would like. Slow down. Place each stitch exactly where you want it. Whoever said that good machine quilting has to be done fast might have been trying to sell you a machine that was manufactured to stitch at a billion stitches per minute. This is like driving a car or preforming anything with accuracy, slow the movement of your hands while maintaining the steady speed of the machine. With more stitches, smaller stitches, occupying the same amount of space,you will achieve tiny curves, accurately follow a marked line or the seams of patchwork.

Til next Sunday, Have a productive week,

Joanie

Dashed-line-99CC99Read more About Joanie, her Career Highlights, or print Joanie’s Short Bio.
Can’t wait for a blog post of all of this advice? Explore helpful info already on the website: Glossary of Frequently used Machine Quilting Terms, How to Prepare for a Class, Quick Start Guide to Marking and Resizing Quilting Designs, Printable Charts for Quilting Facts, The Tips Page, and announcements of  Upcoming Events.

machine quilting classes

I will be teaching at this event, come join me!

Dashed-line-99CC99Never miss an issue of this free e-zine, Joanie’s Life Changing Machine Quilting Lessons. Just watch for reminders from Joanie on her Facebook page or to receive a reminder sent to your inbox, use the sign-up form at the top of the sidebar on this page. 

If you feel you friends, family or quilt guild would benefit from this insight please invite them to join.  I’d really appreciate it!

Dashed-line-99CC99The information, illustrations and photographs on this blog copyright Joanie Zeier Poole unless otherwise noted. No reproduction in any form is permitted without permission. All rights reserved. Please ask permission for using any content and give credit when sharing what you have learned. Heirloom Quilting Designs was founded by Joanie Zeier Poole in 2000, a new millennium with a new dream for the future!

 

 

 

Three Terrific Machine Quilting Techniques – Straight Line

Today’s post will help clear up some confusion that I often encounter when meeting the quilting public concerning the terms used when referring to the different techniques achieved when machine quilting with a home sewing machine. Teaching at guilds across the county, I meet quilters who have been quilting for their entire life, others are new to this vast and diverse world of quilting. Newcomers observe the production of wonderful quilt tops that will be completed by hiring a longarm quilter: (Please don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against that decision, the availability of longarm industry has meant the completion of more tops than anyone can count and provides an income for the longarm quilter’s families in a business they love) a  percentage of successful machine quilters using their home sewing machine, others who are afraid of ruining their tops trying it and seldom is even a mention of tied quilts.

While you know that it is surely possible to use a regular machine to quilt the layers together, you may wonder how to use your equipment and attachments to get varying results. Your choices are to quilt with either a walking foot, or use the free-motion technique in two different ways. Over the next three posts we will examine how to set up your machine when using different attachments for different techniques. I will share when to use each technique and any cautions for their use.

2 walk feet copy feed-dogs-

Machine Quilting with a Walking Foot

Straight line machine quilting is often accomplished with a walking foot installed and the feed dogs up and engaged. The foot moves in a walking motion, (thus the name) working together with the feed dogs to advance all three layers at the same time, avoiding puckers. 

Stitching with the feed dogs up has the advantage of having a consistent stitch length. You may think “GREAT! Sounds like a lot of control without any puckers, I’ll always use a walking foot“. Many people have used this method to complete all of their quilts and never add free-motion to their skills.

*Historical Note: Machine Quilting may not be as recent as you  think; research the work of Ernest B. Haight, a prolific early pioneer of  machine quilting. His book, Practical Machine-Quilting for the Homemaker, published about a half century ago was available for $1.00 including postage!

However, keep in mind, when the feed dogs are up and engaged, each time you need to turn a corner, the entire quilt bundle must be rotated. This can be a huge consequence when the quilt is large and has to be persuaded through the small opening of the machine head. 

What are some things that can be done with a walking foot

Straight line stitching with a walking foot is often referred to as functional quilting, look at these examples of straight line quilting to see why it got that name.   

Anchoring the quilt – permanent stitches that hold the layers creating large work zones to add more quilting in later.

Checker boardThis table mat for playing checkers or chess, was anchored with stitch-in-the-ditch quilting along the narrow black border and around the outer edge of the quilt. Next, the lines that form the checkerboard grid were stitched, evenly distributing the quilting throughout the quilt surface in a logical order. 

seamlines This utilitarian quilt show the Stitch-in-the-ditch technique – straight line quilting follows the seams of patchwork and borders, accentuating the graphic impact of the geometric pattern.

oak-leaf-quilting-designThis is a small wholecloth sample quilt from my Oak Leaf and Acorn Quilting Design Collection had the pattern marked on the fabric and then the straight “anchoring” lines were stitched with a walking foot before the free-motion motifs were added.

All over gridStraight lines form a Diagonal Grids used to fill entire quilt surface over patchwork. This is the idea Earnest used to complete hundreds of quilts.

channelSimple straight line Channels form a versatile fill pattern that is appropriate for elegant or the most simple layout.

Curved Grid A walking foot was used to stitch the gently curved lines of this double line grid.   

quilt as u go Quilt as you go Project

The walking foot  worked perfectly when quilting through multiple layers for a Quilt-as-you-go project from my book, The Complete Guide to Machine Quilting, 2012, St. Martin’s Press.

Setting up your sewing machine for quilting using a walking foot

Remove the regular presser foot and install the walking foot that accompanied or was purchased especially for your specific model. Check that the arm on the side, the needle screw clamp,  gets connected to the screw.  Make sure the feed dogs are up. Choose the stitch length appropriate for the weight of thread which is chosen for the purpose of the project and adjust the stitch length regulator for that setting.  Baste the layers of your project and that’s it, you are ready to stitch! walk feet side arm

Next UP! Three Terrific Machine Quilting Techniques –
Free-Motion – Formal

Good Habits: Always make plan to eliminate bulk when assembling each patchwork block, the row of blocks and sewing those into a quilt top. Often I suggest that the block seams be pressed open to evenly distribute the layers of fabric, avoiding a mountain of seams that will distort your stitching consistency. However, for long borders strips that will be stitched in the ditch, press those seams toward the outside of the quilt.  That way you will have a low side of the ditch in which to guide the needle.

Dashed-line-99CC99Read more About Joanie, her Career Highlights, or print Joanie’s Short Bio.
Can’t wait for a blog post of all of this advice? Explore helpful info already on the website: Glossary of Frequently used Machine Quilting Terms, How to Prepare for a Class, Quick Start Guide to Marking and Resizing Quilting Designs, Printable Charts for Quilting Facts, The Tips Page, and announcements of  Upcoming Events.

Dashed-line-99CC99Never miss an issue of this free e-zine, Joanie’s Life Changing Machine Quilting Lessons. Just watch for reminders from Joanie on her Facebook page or to receive a reminder sent to your inbox, use the sign-up form at the top of the sidebar on this page. 

If you feel you friends, family or quilt guild would benefit from this insight please invite them to join.  I’d really appreciate it!

Dashed-line-99CC99The information, illustrations and photographs on this blog copyright Joanie Zeier Poole unless otherwise noted. No reproduction in any form is permitted without permission. All rights reserved. Please ask permission for using any content and give credit when sharing what you have learned. Heirloom Quilting Designs was founded by Joanie Zeier Poole in 2000, a new millennium with a new dream for the future!

Joanie’s Life Changing Machine Quilting Lessons

Joanie's Quilting Elements Book Book

Projects from Joanie’s Quilting Elements Book

It is with great pride that I welcome you to my first blog post, an introduction to what is planned for this e-zine. It is my privilege to have a new bridge to reach you. With so much to say, where do I start?

First, you need to know these two things; I use my regular sewing machine to hold the layers of my quilts together and I sincerely want you to become a successful machine quilter.

Who is this blog is for?

Whether you are new to machine quilting or a seasoned expert, with the right supplies and the correct steps to follow, YOU can complete quilts on equipment you already own. No need to be afraid; anyone with a positive attitude can learn. This skill is not dependent on years of other quilting experience. Together we will explore one concept and then build on that to grasp another.

This is information I wish I had had before I tried machine quilting and failed. For years I was a machine quilting wannabe, with the same questions, misconceptions and FEARS you may have! I envied the magnificent stitching at quilt shows and wondered how it was even possible to get that whole quilt under the head of a regular sewing machine? Have you had the same thought?

Well lucky for both of us that I was determined to figure it out! In 2000, I took a 3 day seminar from Diane Gaudynski and the future began to unfold before my eyes.

Ode to Diane

Ode to Diane 50″ x 50″, 2000. Quilted just weeks after the seminar.

Imagine my delight, not only to learn the technique, but to realize it was now possible to draw and stitch any designs imaginable! I arranged my life to be trained to use a computer for drawing the quilting designs that I hope will enhance your quilts.

Ode to Diane

Quilting designs were created to exactly fill the space.

My former career in Home Dec and training in art prepared me to look at the challenges of designing quilts from a unique point of view. This blog will provide a platform to share how I invented methods for my original layouts when no process existed for the desired results. I will demonstrate how to preform many tasks differently than other teachers may have advised; learn why and how this will lead to your success. Some ideas will save time and others save your money by utilizing simple ideas that don’t require additional equipment.

Joanie Zeier Poole with hteacher, Diane Gaudynski

Diane Gaudynski with Joanie Zeier Poole, AQS Paducah, 2006

For 15 years I have dedicated my talents to solving your machine quilting mysteries. With practice, I gained the confidence to enter shows and began teaching. By perfecting the techniques, testing supplies, writing 4 books and listening to the questions of students, I have developed a step-by-step process for you. I discovered that at 5’ 2” working with a quilt rolled up and supported by my body would never work so I found supplies that allowed me to work with the quilt “puddled” on a table. Just think how that one concept may have impacted your experience in the past!

working  puddle copy

The weight of the quit is on the table, not on me!

 

What you can expect…

My plan is for weekly posts plus a possible quick note for big news. I have a list of enough topics for a year! We will begin with an thorough explanation of the 3 techniques for machine quilting. Then, the most FAQs; the questions everybody asks and how I learned these are not the important answers you need. All topics will be archived for future reference.

The blog will support the educational opportunities I already have established. My job includes classroom teaching and maintaining a website with the goal of selling books, How-to DVDs, patterns and quilting designs collections. As the blog progresses I hope you may decide to come to a class or purchase a product.

If you share a passion for machine quilting education and designs, sign up to have this free e-zine posted to your inbox (instructions below). Receive machine quilting advice, tips, and suggestions for skill building exercises. If you ask a question and we can start a forum discussion.

Join me to experience the satisfaction of finishing your projects yourself. Start your adventure today, knowing I will be here to encourage and support you.

Warm regards, Joanie

Teaching machine quilting“Learning is not attained by chance; it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.” 

(ar´dor (noun) intense emotion: Passion, Enthusiasm, Devotion)

― Abigail Adams

Dashed-line-99CC99Read more About Joanie, her Career Highlights, or print Joanie’s Short Bio.
Can’t wait for a blog post of all of this advice? Explore helpful info already on the website: Glossary of Frequently used Machine Quilting Terms, How to Prepare for a Class, Quick Start Guide to Marking and Resizing Quilting Designs, Printable Charts for Quilting Facts, The Tips Page, and announcements of  Upcoming Events.

Dashed-line-99CC99Never miss an issue of this free e-zine, Joanie’s Life Changing Machine Quilting Lessons. Just watch for reminders from Joanie on her Facebook page or to receive a reminder sent to your inbox, use the sign-up form at the top of the sidebar on this page. 

If you feel you friends, family or quilt guild would benefit from this insight please invite them to join.  I’d really appreciate it!

Dashed-line-99CC99The information, illustrations and photographs on this blog copyright Joanie Zeier Poole unless otherwise noted. No reproduction in any form is permitted without permission. All rights reserved. Please ask permission for using any content and give credit when sharing what you have learned. Heirloom Quilting Designs was founded by Joanie Zeier Poole in 2000, a new millennium with a new dream for the future!

Tools ‹ Joanie Zeier Poole — WordPress

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